Reading Bingo PrintableDoes anyone else often get stuck reading the same type of book or other reading material over and over again? And do you read in the same place all the time?

I do. I’ve been stuck on British crime novels for a long time now (and I’m addicted to British crime TV dramas as well, but that’s an issue for another day). And I always read either in my recliner or in my bed. It’s kind of a routine, and while there’s nothing wrong with routines, I think I need to mix it up a little. Maybe you do too.

With that in mind, I created a Reading Bingo printable for myself and for you, my loyal blog readers. I made it with both adults and independent kid readers in mind, so various ages can use it.

This is a great tool to use with kids who love to read as well as those who need a little prompting to get some more reading time in.

You might want to give yourself a certain time frame to get “bingo”—like summer or a specific month. Maybe your goal will be to cross off the whole board. Or you might want to make it a contest with a friend, child, or even your entire family. It’s up to you to do whatever you wish with it.

If you decide to play Reading Bingo, I’d love to hear about your plans for you and/or your kids. Leave a comment below to give the rest of us ideas.

Click here to download the Reading Bingo pdf: Reading Bingo


Want another way to connect with your kids over books?

If so, you need to check out our companion novels for women and tweens. The two books have an intertwining storyline, but one is written for adults and one is written for children. Adults can connect with kids by reading the books together and discussing the characters, story, and themes of forgiveness and community service. Click below to find out more.

Connect with Kids by Reading Companion Novels // A novel for adults and a novel for kids: both books contain a shared storyline, with the same characters, timeline, and setting, but they're written from two different points of view and for two different age groups. // #reading #parenting #kids #books #fiction #family


The purpose of this website is to inspire people to live well and serve others and then influence the children in their lives to do the same. You can find other resources that will help you influence kids to live well and serve others in our online store and on our companion novels page. 

Adam and Nancy Blaue: Imagining a Library

 

Nancy Blaue met her husband, Adam, when she was 14 years old. He claims it was love at first sight, but Nancy’s not so sure. Nevertheless, the two got married just months after she graduated from high school in the early 1990s. Due to some medical issues, the couple were advised to have children early on. The two became parents at what most would consider a very young age, but their family was soon complete with two daughters and a son.

Adam and Nancy live on a farm in northern Montgomery County, Missouri, where they raised their children. Their two daughters, Katie and Libby, are now married and both are expecting babies. Will, their son, will graduate from Wellsville-Middletown R-1 High School in just a few weeks.

If you’ve ever met Nancy, you know she is not only dedicated to her own family, but she also cares about the families surrounding her. Nearly everything she does is focused on serving families of all shapes and sizes in her community.

Continue reading “Nancy Blaue: Imagining a Library in Every Home”

NOTE: This page contains affiliate links. If you click through and make a purchase or sign up for a program, I may earn a commission. This is at no additional cost to you.

Books That Teach Kids About ForgivenessAs adults, we know forgiveness is a virtue we all need to cultivate, but we also realize it’s not easily learned. Kids often have a hard time with it (as do adults!), and they need to have forgiveness modeled to them by the people around them in order to begin to understand the need for and importance of it.

As with many things in life, kids (and adults) can also learn about forgiveness from stories—both non-fiction and fiction. Through stories, kids can observe situations where other children need to forgive, and they can learn from the ways the characters deal with those situations.

The following fiction books will help kids understand the importance of forgiveness. This isn’t an exhaustive list of books that teach forgiveness by any means, as many books deal with the theme of forgiveness in minor ways. However, these books place a primary focus on the value of forgiveness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Books That Teach Kids About Forgiveness // #kids #parenting #teaching #reading #forgiveness #books #childrensbooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Books That Teach Kids About Forgiveness // #kids #parenting #teaching #reading #forgiveness #books #childrensbooks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Books That Teach Kids Forgiveness”

How to Connect with Kids Over Books They Love; #kids #parenting #reading #books

 

How to Use Books to Connect with Kids // Find out how to look for repeating themes in books kids love, and learn how to capitalize on that knowledge in order to connect with them. // #reading #kids #parenting #teaching #books #family #connect #children

I recently had the opportunity to talk to the fifth grade students at School of the Osage in Osage Beach, Missouri, about writing and books. While thinking about what I wanted to say, I thought back to the books I loved as a kid.

I read a ridiculous amount of books when I was little. (And I still do.) But what I realized the other day is that I don’t remember much about most of those books.

There’s even very little I recall about the book I read more than any other book in elementary school: Superfudge by Judy Blume. I’ve always been the kind of person who hates to crack a spine, dog-ear a page, or otherwise mar a book. But my copy of Superfudge was nearly falling apart by the time I outgrew it. Yet I still have very little memory of what it was about, other than the fact that Fudge had an older brother named Peter and a baby sister named Tootsie.

My parents’ basement currently houses boxes upon boxes of Bobbsey Twins, Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, and Trixie Belden mysteries. However, I remember exactly one minor storyline from any of those hundreds of books. Continue reading “Connect with Kids Over Books They Love”